Dec 082013
 

Photo by: meddygarnetIf you’re living a truly conscious life, then you naturally have great respect for animals.

And you probably also feel great pain at how they are often treated by humans.

Sometimes it’s even disheartening that so little progress is made so slowly.

But there’s good news.

As part of the human race, the more we contribute to raising human consciousness — with respect to animals but also in general — the treatment of animals by humans is bound to improve as well.

This is because raising consciousness is a way to work more closely with cause rather than with effect, or symptoms.

Raising Awareness

Right now, the way animals are treated is abysmal and this article won’t detail the atrocities. If you aren’t aware of them, but would like to be, the film EARTHLINGS is an excellent place to start. It’s about practices that are typical yet — with good reason — are always hidden from view. But be forewarned, it’s a moving film which may literally traumatize you, like it did me. (You can check out some reviews here. They are compelling.)

Another source of excellent information is the PETA website (People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals). If you yourself are ever interested in living a vegetarian or vegan lifestyle, they have lots of helpful information, free kits to help you make changes, lots of recipes, and leads to really great resources.

Veganism, and Cruelty-Free Living

If you do look into going vegan, you’ll find out that it’s not always just about diet (i.e. not eating animals and/or animal products).

It’s more about a “cruelty-free” way of life.

A cruelty-free lifestyle involves not eating or using any type of animal product, especially when the animals were mistreated during processing.

Many of us don’t think about it but this means not supporting industries that promote the fancy leather car seats (or furniture), leather shoes or jackets, animal hide accessories, down clothing or bedding, fancy or beautiful feathers, fur, boar bristles, wool products (including lanolin), and even silk. Some vegans even shy away from using honey unless it’s from a natural and organic source.

Humane Options

It’s startling how many of our household products, from toiletries to cleaning supplies, are tested on animals. Even some of the companies that claim not to test on animals sometimes contract out to a third party who does. Most of these testing practices are cruel. And of course, some of our medicines/drugs (such as Premarin) are derived from animals who are treated horrifically.

There are often times when animals, insects, etc. encroach on us and we have to draw the line somewhere. Again, there are many humane options available now, and thankfully most are available to all of us via the internet.

It may take more time to research and use these methods, but a conscious, kind person will make the effort.

As you read these stories you will see that whenever I was properly humble and willing to let something besides a human be my instructor, these various four-legged, six-legged, and no-legged fellows shared priceless wisdom with me. They taught me that perfect understanding and perfect co-operation between the human and all other forms of life is unfailing whenever the human really does his required part.

~ Foreword to Kinship with All Life, by J. Allen Boone, 1954

So there are many ways we can all play an active role in our own lives to honor animals as sentient beings.

Doing so not only benefits them but it benefits us as well.

A conscious person always benefits from living in integrity, and conscious integrity allows for nothing short of respect for all sentient beings. (Including our fellow humans, by the way!)

And if you get nothing else from this post, get this:

As part of the human race,
raising your own consciousness will necessarily
help raise the consciousness of human-kind in general,
with countless positive side-effects.

And it’s a most rewarding type of activism!

How You Can Make a Difference

Consider adding just one additional practice to your lifestyle that is respectful of animals or will help raise human consciousness with regard to them.

And really, it’s not always even about “adding” a practice as it is merely “substituting”.

And note that it doesn’t have to be all or nothing! This is an important thing to remember. So many don’t do anything because they know they are not willing or able to “give it all up”. But that’s not necessary! Perhaps you could be vegetarian one day per week. Or be vegetarian instead of vegan.

Anything at all that you are willing to do is a step forward.

Here are some ideas (most from this article) and resources:

In closing, I’d like to leave you with one of my favorite quotes about these magnificent beings (also quoted in the film EARTHLINGS):

We need another and a wiser and perhaps a more mystical concept of animals. … We patronize them for their incompleteness, for their tragic fate of having taken form so far below ourselves. And therein we err, and greatly err. For the animal shall not be measured by man. In a world older and more complete than ours they move finished and complete, gifted with extensions of the senses we have lost or never attained, living by voices we shall never hear. They are not brethren, they are not underlings; they are other nations, caught with ourselves in the net of life and time, fellow prisoners of the splendour and travail of the earth.

~ Henry Beston

Thank-you in advance, from all Earthlings!

Patti


Great Holiday Gift Idea!

If you’re an animal-lover, and have friends or family who are animal-lovers, consider this:

Animal-Kind International (AKI) is an excellent non-profit, where 100% of your donation goes to their cause; NOT to overhead, NOT to promotion, but directly toward animal welfare.

♥    ♥

If you make a donation in your gift recipient’s name, AKI will send them a holiday card letting them know and showing the animal you/they helped! Isn’t this a great gift? I think so! (You can see their latest newsletter for more details about this. And don’t you just love Squiffy?)

♥    ♥

On their site, they show many of the individual animals they are in the process of helping. You can make a general donation or sponsor a particular animal.

Guapa, before and after

Guapa, before and after, courtesy Animal-Kind International

They do such good work, I hope you’ll take a moment to check them out.

And even if this gift-giving idea doesn’t ring your chimes, keep them in mind when you feel it in your heart to make a donation to help animals.   (Subscribe to their newsletter, follow them on Facebook, and/or read their wonderful blog written by Karen, AKI’s founder!)

Thank-you! And Happy Holidays to you and “yours”!

Dec 212011
 

If you’re going to be separated from your pet for any length of time, you’ll find peace of mind in knowing that you really can “talk” with them about it beforehand, as well as connect with them while you’re apart.

It’s natural, and not all that difficult.

When we’d had our first yellow lab for about a year, we left him behind when we went on vacation. It happened to be the day after we reprimanded him for eating a sandwich off the coffee table. We took him to the boarding kennel the next day, said goodbye, and flew off to Hawaii.

We returned 10 days later and picked him up at the kennel. He was more than ecstatic. Even as we were getting into the car he was still licking us, squeaking, and panting.

Just as we all settled in for the hour-long drive home, it hit me — and it wasn’t just a thought. I literally felt it like a stab in the heart as I realized he thought we had abandoned him.

He had no idea we were coming back for him. I knew this with certainty. Immediately I began crying and trying to explain to him that we would never leave him like that. But by then he’d already gone through 10 days thinking we had.

Never ever did I want to do that to him again.

I didn’t know until years later that I didn’t have to. That I could communicate with him ahead of time in a way that he would understand, and know that we were coming back for him — and even when. (In fact, you can touch in with them from far away too, even while you’re separated.)

The main technique is that of speaking to them in pictures as you learned in part 3 of this series.

And you’ll feel more confident that you’re actually connecting if you take the time to practice the exercise from part 1 as well.

Before You Separate

If you know ahead of time that you’ll be separated, that’s ideal. Even if you only have a few minutes, that’s enough in most cases. For complex situations there are several actions you can take that take more time, but for the most part what you need to do is pretty quick.

The general idea is to prepare your pet for what they’ll experience while you’re separated. There are lots of aspects of this.

1. Length of time

Think about how you experience time, how they experience time, and then how you can put that into pictures.

If it’s hours, you might show them you’re gone until you come home and feed them dinner. Or maybe you’re gone until it gets dark. See them at home while it’s light; imagine it getting a little darker, then see and hear your car returning home.

If it’s days, see it getting dark, then light, then dark, then light again (for however many days it will be).

Some animal communicators say that animals can understand numbers, e.g. I’ll be back in 3 days. I don’t disbelieve that but if you want to do that I suggest you also use visuals along with it, at least until you have a sense your pet understands.

2. People and places

Imagine the people your pet will likely encounter. If you know what they look like, all the better. Sometimes you don’t (for example, if you’re boarding a pet there may be various people at the kennel). You can imagine people while you think consciously of the concept that there will be a lot of people around.

If they’ll be home, or maybe in a boarding environment, show them that too.

FEEL and project the idea of safety while you show them where they’ll be, with whom, and their daily routine.

3. Activities

You may be aware of some of the activities your pets will experience. If so, play them out in detail if you can.

Again, the most important thing is that you FEEL safe and calm. See them having fun and enjoying themselves. If you just can’t imagine it being pleasant for them, then see if you can feel them experiencing it as an adventure.

It can be especially helpful to anticipate the things that may upset your pet and play through those with that sense of safety. For example, if your animal will be traveling by plane without you, play through the noise and commotion of a busy airport, what it might feel like in the cargo hold, etc. All the while, assure your pet they are safe.

4. Reunion

Most importantly, see the two of you being reunited. Do this last, so that what you are telling them is as much in order as you can make it.

Don’t worry about every little detail being right or even that everything be in perfect order.

You just want to get the general ideas and feelings communicated to them. That’s enough, as that’s a lot! Most pets don’t get the luxury of anything even close to this kind of connection.

While You’re Separated

If you’re just separated for a short time (e.g. hours), you don’t need to do anything to reconnect unless you want to or unless your pet suffers separation anxiety.

But if it’s a longer period of time, it can help to check in periodically.

1. Connect

When you have a quiet moment (eventually, you don’t even need it to be quiet), just connect with them. Use a photo of them if it will help.

2. Visualize

And then simply repeat some of the things you communicated above, all the while feeling a calm sense of safety and contentment.

Stay Calm Yourself

A lot of people are so connected with their pets and vice versa that they worry whenever they’ll be separated for a long period of time or during unusual situations.

This is one of the worst things you can do.

It really helps them if you remember that you have done everything you can to keep them safe and happy and the final ingredient in that being possible is for YOU to feel calm and happy about it all.

They do sense that and it does make a difference.

Take a look at part 2 of this series for some ideas of ways to think about it which will help you both be more at peace while you’re apart.

More Practical Tips

This isn’t specific to Animal Communication but here are some other things that can help you both feel more calm too.

1. Acclimate them

Whatever you can get them used to ahead of time: do!

Whether it’s the people they’ll be with, crates they may travel in, certain foods they’ll be eating, environments they’ll be in, etc. Do whatever you can to expose them to those things for short periods of time and in a calm manner.

And make them positive experiences as much as you can. Maybe give them treats during or after if that makes sense.

2. Leave them a reminder of you

If possible, leave something of yours with them while you’re separated. This is especially good for dogs or cats, who rely so much on their sense of smell. So, for example, a t-shirt you’ve worn or a blanket you’ve used can go with them in their crate or to the kennel.

3. Use Rescue Remedy

Use Bach Rescue Remedy during and after. You can have a caretaker put it in their food or water just like they would a medicine. Or if you’re leaving them with a blanket or t-shirt, you can spray it with Rescue Remedy beforehand.

Afterwards it helps them process any kind of trauma they may have experienced.

This is a lot to absorb at once and I’ve only scratched the surface, but I’m sure you can use your own creativity to expand these ideas to fit whatever situation you might be facing. That’s half the fun of it, after all!

Let me know if you have any questions. Or if you have experiences with this kind of thing, or other suggestions, please let us all know.

Thanks for reading, and happy holidays to you … and your pets!

Dec 122011
 

If you have a pet that you need to have behave in a certain way, you can appreciate the value in having a supportive or reinforcing technique handy.

Here’s an extremely useful one that you can use in lots of situations.

Speak With Pictures

We’ve already talked about communicating telepathically with your pet using any or all of your senses.

When you imagine a scenario you want to encourage, you can and should continue to use other senses, but one of the easiest and most effective ways to get a telepathic message to your pet is to use your visual sense to create pictures.

(And note that the ideas I’m giving here for vision can still apply to other senses too.)

To Encourage Positives

Typically, when we want to relay a message or suggestion, it’s something good or something we want our pet to do.

When this is the case, simply imagine in your mind’s eye what that looks like, literally.

You can experiment with doing it from your point of view, and also from your pet’s perspective.

To Discourage Negatives

When there’s something you don’t want them to do or you want them to stop doing, it gets a little trickier, but only because you have to get creative yourself.

The idea is to turn it around into what you want them to do instead, and then imagine that in your mind’s eye.

So, for example, if you don’t want your dog to go into the street, see them stopping at the sidewalk. You might even see them turning around at the sidewalk and coming back to the house. (Note I’m not saying to do this instead of training or other practical restraint measures! It’s done as an adjunct with them in situations like this.)

Or if you don’t want them to bark when someone comes to the door, what do you want them to do instead? Think about that and imagine it in every detail.

A Few Other Tips

Whenever you’re encouraging a new behavior, it’s helpful to take an extra moment to see (in your mind’s eye) your pet getting some congratulations, affection, or a treat right after they do what you want them to do. And then, when they do it, give them that! Besides reinforcing the behavior, it helps confirm to them that you were, indeed, “talking” to them.

As to senses other than visual, you can also give commands from a distance (in your mind) if your pet is already responsive to those commands. And even though “No” is a negative, if they already are responsive to that, don’t hesitate to use it especially in a dangerous situation.

As with any kind of training, it’s good to repeat the practice lots of times before it’s actually needed, or intersperse it with times when it’s needed.

An Example: Discourage then Encourage

Our boxer (God rest her sweet soul) used to be very protective of us when we were in our outdoor jacuzzi at night.

She would go off barking to all corners of our property, and it was annoying not only to us but I’m sure to the neighbors, too.

The problem was, she was getting old and losing her hearing, so even whistling for her had become futile.

So we decided to use telepathy.

We used a mixture of different techniques, but it went something like this:

1. We calmed ourselves down, so that we truly were okay instead of distressed about her barking. Otherwise she would sense anxiety from us, making her anxious or making her think we were in a distressing situation where we need her protection.

2. We made a deliberate connection by thinking her name as if she were right next to us and we were getting her attention.

3. We imagined what we wanted, which was for everything to be very quiet. I would put myself “inside” her and feel myself just being quiet and calm, i.e. not barking. (Discouragement from barking.)

4. Then we would telepathically issue the “Come” command. She was a very obedient dog, but for good measure I would then …

5. Envision her returning to where we were. I would do this either from her perspective (imagining myself, as her, coming up the hill and across the driveway) or from our perspective (seeing her come around the corner of the house toward us), or both. (Encouragement to return to the house.)

It worked! It worked immediately and repeatedly. It was amazing even to us how responsive she was, but I’m sure that was at least partly due to the fact that a few years before we had all made an agreement of sorts that we would play with communicating that way. She enjoyed it and yet this shows that she also took it seriously.

So don’t forget about all these great modes of communication you have available.

Try them out, and practice them until you see for yourself how well they work. They not only enrich your relationship, but they can be an important means of communicating in serious situation.

Note: This is the 3rd in a series about communicating with your pet energetically (mainly telepathically). The skills are best developed in order. Here are the previous articles:

1. The Very First Step in Communicating With Your Pet
2. Worried About Your Pet? 5 Steps Toward Peace of Mind

Do you have experiences with doing this that you can share? Comments? Questions?


> > > Special GIVEAWAY Announcement < < <

Do you want a free reading? I’m giving away two — winner’s choice of 3 types!

You can choose a:

All I ask is that you:

1) “Like” Lightspirited Being on facebook (button to the right if you’re reading this from the blog) AND

2) Write on Lightspirited Being’s facebook wall that you want to be in the “Solstice Drawing”

That’s it!

I’ll draw 2 qualifying recipients on the Solstice (Dec. 21 here in NM). Please feel free to spread the word until then.

Thanks so much — and good luck!


Nov 172011
 

Sometimes our pets will act peculiar, either for a little while or for an ongoing period.

Did you know that often it has more to do with what’s going on with you than with them?

They do what they can to keep you and your family in balance.

A few years ago someone asked me to use my Animal Communication skills to find out why her dog wouldn’t eat. She’d already had him to the vet (an important initial step) and knew it wasn’t a physical issue.

As I tuned in I got that his hesitancy to eat was somehow related to her (his owner). He was feeling her stress and anxiety which got the ball rolling, and then her stress around his not eating just made the situation worse.

I can’t remember all the details anymore but she was also trying to get him to eat certain things … things that were good for him, but ultimately I got a sense of her being a little obsessive about his food.

As I relayed this information to her, gently suggesting she not be so rigid about his diet because her anxiety about his food and his eating was actually a big part of the issue, she “happened to mention” to me that she was in the throes of an eating disorder. OMG!!!

In this situation, not only was her dog picking up her own issue around food, but also her anxiety around his food plus her anxiety in general. It doesn’t always happen that they act out in the same area of life where we’re having our issues (in this case, food), but this example was just too perfect not to share.

Even when the connection is as obvious as this, we sometimes don’t notice because our issues are not the first thing we think about when our pets have issues. In this example, even with the symptoms being so similar, it didn’t even occur to her that they even might be related until after we’d talked.

Our Pets Act Out Our Anxieties

Any anxiety you’re experiencing will be sensed by your pet and if it’s strong enough, they will begin to act it out.

Anxiety Not Related to Your Pet

In most cases our pets are acting out our stresses that don’t even have anything to do with them.

Maybe you’re worried about financial issues, health issues (your pets often match your symptoms almost exactly), or you’re just out of balance.

These things will definitely affect your pet.

Often they just help us process these things and are no worse for it. In fact that’s a supportive thing we all do for each other in general as part of a social unit. Just like a mobile, we all do our part to keep our family in balance, and our pets are very much a part of that dynamic.

But if it’s intense or prolonged, they’ll begin to show signs in their behavior or their own health.

Anxiety Related to Your Pet

Sometimes they act out anxiety that is related to them.

When it’s because of something they’re doing, it can create kind a mad cycle if what they’re doing is originally related to your anxiety. It just gets worse and worse until you stop the hamster wheel.

But often it’s simply something you’re concerned about because you love them so much and you want them to be happy all the time. (See, I have pets, I know!)

Like you’re going to board them and you don’t want them to be bored (interesting pun, don’t you think?), so you worry.

Or you’ll be traveling and you think they might miss you, so you worry.

Or they’re limping a little bit all of a sudden, so you worry.

Essentially, you have to stop that!

Easier said than done, I know.

What to Do Instead of Worry

First, just reading this and being aware is going to go a long way toward preventing or correcting this situation.

But here are a few ideas for when you see them acting out or even suspect it’s happening.

Better yet, doing these things as a matter of course will prevent your pets from needing to act out your anxiety to begin with.

1. Take care of yourself

If you’ve got deep, ongoing issues of some kind, try to make sure you don’t keep pushing them into the background. Do what you can about them now. What that might be is beyond the scope of this particular blog, but you know what I’m saying.

As in my example with the eating disorder, there can be things like addiction, depression, a bad marriage, a job you hate, etc. that can easily be affecting your pets. Please take care of yourself and they will benefit as well.

This goes for ongoing, serious things and passing issues as well.

2. Take it lightly

As to things related to your pet, be aware that they are very likely to reflect your attitude right back at you.

Are you a parent? Remember when your child took their first few steps, and landed *plop* right on their butt? You find out quickly that if you gasp and panic and run over to soothe them, they quickly pick up that it’s a scary thing and start to cry every time they fall. But if you make a surprised, fun face and say something like “Go boom!” and laugh like it’s fun, they’ll soon be laughing each time and scrambling up to do it again.

It’s the same with our pets, and using this little trick works in all kinds of situations.

3. Be optimistic

Once, during a turbulent flight, my young son and I were both getting nervous. I talked about how planes handle this all the time, and put on an unconcerned attitude. I was surprised to learn that pretending to be brave for his sake not only calmed him, but it had the wonderful side effect of actually allaying my fears too! Soon, I didn’t even have to pretend. And guess what? There was nothing to be nervous about!

Again, just like with our children, this dynamic works with our pets too.

So even if it’s something that might have a difficult outcome, you have a choice. You can make a conscious decision to focus on the positive. New or tentative situations can be an adventure rather than a threat. If and when difficulty actually develops, you can always deal with that then.

In the meantime, keep in your mind that right now all is well.

(If you’re familiar with the Law of Attraction you’ll recognize this as also being a way to help assure a good outcome, and you probably practice this already anyway.)

4. Remember your positive motivation and goals

If you find yourself anxious or concerned about an upcoming activity, remember that you’re doing it for a positive reason.

What is that reason? Keep it in the forefront of your mind.

This is important for personal situations but especially those related to our pets.

For example, your pet needs to go to the vet. We can think about how scared they’ll be when they have to ride in the car (ya right — this is cats, not dogs ;-) ), get examined, get a shot, etc.

But better yet, we can think about how lucky we are to have good vet care, their ears (or whatever reason they’re going for) will feel better, the vet is doing this for them not to them, etc. Even if it’s for euthanasia, they will be relieved of their pain and can fly free, etc.

Or if you’re going to board them, instead of worrying that they will miss you or that they’ll be bored, think about how safe and protected they are in a nice warm building with regular meals and that cozy blanket you left with them.

There’s always a positive or you wouldn’t be doing it. So stay focused on that.

All that said,  it’s important to also remember that animals are sovereign creatures just as we are. They have their reasons for being here, they are strong and magnificent beings, and they deserve to be able to grow through challenges just like we do. It helps all of us when we honor that. We can’t and perhaps shouldn’t try to protect them from everything.

5. Deliberately communicate positive ideas to them

If you haven’t already, you may want to develop the basic skill outlined in my first article of this series “The Very First Step in Communicating With Your Pet“. It gives a simple way to communicate telepathically with them so you have proof and confidence that your pets really are connected intimately with your inner goings-on.

If you commit to practicing it even a little, it pays off in the long run with greater peace of mind for you and like we’ve discussed here, with your pet’s peace of mind as a result of yours.

There are more things you can do that help you be at peace in relation to your pet, for example, touching in with them when you’re separated. But these things are skills (and articles) in themselves, and we’ll cover them and more in later articles in this Animal Communication series about how to connect more consciously with animals.

For now, the idea that you affect your pet profoundly is an important concept to be aware of and revisit often. The suggestions I’ve given are good skills to practice for the duration of your relationship with your pet.

Do you have any examples of when you were mirrored by your pet, or others by theirs? Were you/they aware of it at the time? If so, what did you/they do about it?

Oct 142011
 

If you have pets, you already know that talking to them in a way they can easily understand would be an especially useful skill to have.

Here’s a basic technique in how to send a message and get confirmation that it got through.

No matter what the ultimate purpose or situation, this is the place to start.

Later, when you really need to communicate something important, you’ll already have a connection established. What’s more, you’ll have confidence in that connection, resulting in greater peace of mind.

There are more advanced ways to communicate complex messages for complicated situations, but this is a perfect exercise to begin with. It’s a basic skill that you’ll need to have in place.

You’ll also find that even as simple as it is, it’s a valuable ability to have in its own right. You’ll use it all the time in all kinds of situations.

You’re Already a Team

In some ways, communicating with your own pet can be trickier than with an animal you don’t know. But that’s more true when you’re listening to them.

When you’re talking to them, you’re already connected and they are naturals at telepathic listening, so you’ve got an advantage right away.

That’s why learning to talk to them first is not only easier, but it’s also a fundamental skill to master if you want to advance to two-way communication.

A Strong Foundation

For the most peace of mind on both your parts, you want to practice together and develop your skill well before you actually need it. You want to know you’ve got it down.

Here’s how you can do this and get undeniable confirmation that they hear you and understand.

7 Easy Steps to a Basic Skill

Do this exercise when all is calm and nothing is at stake.

Choose something to tell them ahead of time; something very simple. It should be something positive and something that they would react to, such as a special treat or activity.

Make sure it’s something you’re able and willing to follow through on right after they get the message.

1. Be in the same room as your pet (or near them if you’re outdoors) when they’re relaxed and not involved in anything.

2. Relax and be still. Make sure you’re not giving any explicit or subtle subliminal messages about what you’re thinking.

3. Say their name to yourself, as if you’re calling them. This is to get their attention. Don’t worry if there’s no response … there usually isn’t at this point.

4. Give them the message you’ve already decided on. Do this primarily by imagining it in pictures. But don’t stop there. Use all your senses that can apply to conjure up the full experience. And feel it emotionally too. The more energy you can put into this step, the more chance of success you’ll have.

(It can help to visualize from your pet’s point of view rather than yours, but this isn’t always necessary. Experiment.)

5. Pay attention to your pet, and watch for any change at all. You want to get familiar with how they respond when they get the message. They’ll respond to different messages differently, but often they’ll at least turn and look at you. If it’s something they want, they’ll sometimes get up and come to you.

6. If you don’t see a response yet, you can form all the conjuring you just did into a “ball” and mentally toss it to them.

7. If you do get a response, or even if you suspect that maybe they got your message, then follow through on your promise right away! It’s very important not just to build trust but to confirm to them that you really were talking to them.

Don’t be disappointed if nothing happens yet. Repeat a few times. If still nothing after about 10 min. or so, then try again some other time. Maybe you weren’t really relaxed, or were preoccupied, or some other factor wasn’t in place. Sometimes it takes a few sessions before it all comes together.

When I experimented with these steps in preparation for writing this article, I was able to get confirmation from our lab, Ollie, that he had heard me within 5 to 10 min.

I didn’t get a response with one treat, so the second time through I envisioned a different one. (Oddly, the first is his favorite.) But even though he was snoozing and facing away from me, he just suddenly lifted his head, turned it toward me, and stared at me. It was as if I’d just called his name out loud.

Keep the Lines Open

You can also tell them that you want this to be a regular thing you do with them. Some animals are enthusiastic practice partners and you’ll notice a difference in them when you begin to practice regularly. They love the attention.

Since going through these steps with Ollie, I’ve noticed him reading my thoughts more. I was typing here at my computer and thought about taking him for a walk. He came over right then, sat by me, and just looked at me. This happened a few times. And then, just a few minutes ago as I was typing about the treats, it happened again! (That means he needs a treat now, right? Right!) We’re building a stronger rapport very quickly.

Practice Makes Perfect

So try this out as often as you have time for. Try to remember to do it for little, unimportant things that you would be doing anyway … Before you pick up the leash or the car keys. Before you reach for that special treat.

Once you’ve had success with this, branch out to things that aren’t necessarily positive or exciting for them, such as before you leave the house for awhile. Show them that they’ll be home alone. Notice that their response is different than if they’re going to go for a walk. Make a mental note of it and learn how to recognize their various responses.

Please come back and give me a report. Were the steps clear? Any questions? What happened? I’d love to hear.

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