Nov 022012
 

Life as a Doorway to the Field“Death is not the opposite of life. Life has no opposite. The opposite of death is birth. Life is eternal.”

~ Eckhart Tolle, Stillness Speaks

I LOVE this quote. It’s crossed my mind often since first reading it.

And it’s come to mind most recently after losing our sweet lab, Ollie, especially because I had a lot of synchronicities that made me aware — at a deep level — of the same thing.

Life Abounds

It started just a few days after his death.

I was in the back yard and as I looked up I saw 2 mourning doves walking around the bush from his grave. Now, I never see mourning doves back there, even rarely see them at all around here. And that they should come right from his grave while I was there … Well, let’s just say I noticed.

Shortly after that, I was walking over to visit his grave and out hopped a bunny from behind it. It came right over to me, within about 3′, and stopped right at the grave. Again, I took notice.

Even funnier, the next morning I got up and there was the bunny lying in the backyard, all stretched out, right where Ollie used to lay all stretched out!

This was odd enough but this happened several days in a row.

This was getting a little strange, even for me!

Over the next week or two, the quote just kept coming back to mind.

And it seemed that everywhere I went, there was Life.

There were lizards, snakes, birds (ravens, baby flycatchers that hatched and flew the coop, and another mourning dove that flew right in front of me), a big moth that sat right on the post near me on the front porch while I worked, and of course, bunnies galore — to name a few.

Life Goes On

All of this made me sooo aware that Life goes on.

And I don’t mean “life goes on” like your life situation has to continue.

I mean Life just goes on! There is no end to it.

And I did revel in the fact that Ollie was still around. I felt him, not only as his presence, but as Life itself!

I recently did a book review of Dying To Be Me by Anita Moorjani about her near-death experience (NDE). But did you know I had my own NDE? I did … Not as involved as Anita’s, but enough for me to get a taste of what happens when we die. And I can tell you, Life goes on! It’s amazing.

Life = The Field of Magic & Miracles

So you may wonder what this has to do with Emergence.

Well, experiencing the Life that you are — even your life force (which is a little bit of an abstraction of it but still a good stepping stone) — is a doorway to the state of consciousness you enter when you “do” Emergence.

It’s your conscious connection to a powerful field of magic and miracles.

In some ways, the state is impossible to speak of, but there are a lot of pointers that can help lead you to it.

This is one of them. (Note: For some instruction on experiencing your life force and using it to strengthen your immune system or even heal, see remedy #16 in Kiss Your Cold Goodbye Fast With These 20 Natural and Vibrational Remedies.)

And once you’re adept at entering the state … at being … and being life consciously, with awareness — the rest is a piece of cake. ;-)

The truth is: you don’t have a life, you are life, the One Life, the one consciousness that pervades the entire universe and takes temporary form to experience itself as a stone or a blade of grass, as an animal, a person, a star or a galaxy.

Can you sense deep within that you already know that? Can you sense that you already are That?

~ Eckhart Tolle, Stillness Speaks

Thanks for reading, and here’s to you — as Life emerging!

Patti

 

 

As usual, I’d love to hear what you have to share about this topic, or any questions you might have. Just use the comment box! Thank you!


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Oct 252012
 

Dying To Be Me: My Journey from Cancer, to Near Death, to True HealingDying To Be Me by Anita Moorjani is one of my favorite books of all time, and believe me, I’ve read a lot of books.

There is so much more value here than you might expect from a book about a near-death experience (NDE). You will find it not only comforting with regard to death (your own or those you love) but it’s an affirmation of life, and inspiring in general.

Just as important, you’ll find it helpful in many practical ways.

Is This Book for You?

You can benefit from this book if:

  • You or someone you know is facing death
  • You’re grieving the death of a loved one, including a pet
  • You’re facing illness of any kind, serious or otherwise
  • You’re experiencing challenging emotions such as depression or lack of interest in life
  • You want to feel more whole, healthy, and vibrant
  • You simply want to feel better in general … happier, more at peace, more purposeful, etc.
  • You would like an enlightened way to understand or experience life and your place in it

As you can see, I would recommend this book to anyone and everyone. And it’s a book that I envision myself reviewing periodically for my own benefit.

How It Unfolds

Anita begins by setting the stage with a brief biography of relevant parts of her life. She describes the experience of becoming incapacitated with terminal cancer, and I love that she describes its unfolding not only on the outside but from “the inside” as well.

But fairly quickly, she jumps right into the NDE. This is the part I want everyone to read who has ever lost anyone to death, or is facing it themselves. The way she describes it is breath-taking and eye-opening. It’s beautiful, actually, and you’ll never forget it.

And just as extraordinary is the explanation of how she then “came back” and proceeded to completely heal. Yes, completely! And how she learned to allow for this “unfolding of miracles” as she puts it.

Life Even Through Death

So it’s not just a book about death and what happens at that moment.

It’s even more a book about life; about who and what you are; about healing and wholeness … and about allowing your whole world to transform.

It’s fascinating to read how you — as your essence — live even through death. And much more freely than you probably are now!

So what does that mean?

How can you live with that same freedom even as you live your life?

Insights and Practices

In her quest to help others through her experience, she shares her thoughts about how you can apply what she’s come to know.

From her expanded understanding of reality, she shares in a way that you can apply in everyday life:

  • Why she got sick and how she healed
  • How to connect with the soul of your magnificence
  • Experiencing profound freedom in your life
  • Trusting the wisdom of the infinite self
  • What it means to Be (allow) vs. Do — and thus experience vast inner peace and a beautiful flow in your life

You’ve really got to read it yourself since there’s so much more to it than I could even put words to; pretty apropos given its expansive nature.

And I’m sure you’ll find your own gems within it, probably new and different insights and practices each time you read it, depending on your perspectives at that time.

It’s got a richness and depth to it that I enjoy applying and know I will for years to come.

Also Recommended …

Soon after reading the book, I came upon her audio Deep Meditation for Healing. Just like the book, I love it. Anita does a beautiful job of taking you into a relaxed, receptive state and reminding you of your magnificence, freedom, and power. You’ll actually feel it and come away more whole and with a new perspective.

It doesn’t replace the book, but it’s an awesome adjunct to it, or it could even stand on its own.

Disclaimer: I received this book for free from Hay House Publishing for review purposes, and true to form, they encourage complete honesty in our reviews. Still — no matter what — you can always rest assured that any reviews on this site reflect my honest evaluation.

Until next time, thanks for reading!

Patti

 

 

Have you read this book? What did you think of it? Would love to hear in the comments. :-)

May 232011
 

Dying’s not a sin; not living is.

Jack Lemmon’s character Jake in the movie Dad

I’m in the midst of a bit of a health scare, and have been finding myself examining just what this thing called life actually is, and what it means to me. Of course, I’ve done this before, but situations like this (and on the tails of just having lost my sweet Jasmine) bring a sudden raw clarity about how precious and fleeting our lives are that just isn’t always there otherwise.

On Roses and Poo

We’ve all heard the expression “Stop and smell the roses”. This is great advice. Some of us have gotten really good at it, too.

The problem comes when we get a whiff of poo. I have yet to hear the expression “Stop and smell the poo.” And just for the record, I’m not exactly suggesting that.

But what I am suggesting is that you do stop and appreciate that you can smell the poo. (And the roses too, I suppose. ;-) )

Now, Law of Attraction people (of which I am one, to a degree) would say that the poo provides contrast so you can become more aware that you want roses. That you don’t have to settle for poo but instead can attract roses. This may be.

Life and Its Content

But even at best, the Law of Attraction still only addresses the content of your life. As fun as it may be to learn how to attract roses instead of poo, you’re still just playing in a world of manifestation. Of content.

And by content, I mean everything that appears to be other than your unchanging true nature, your essence. That includes your thoughts, emotions, psychological makeup, energy body, physical body, etc. Even these that seem so close are content.

And life itself is bigger than just content. Much bigger.

The real thrill is learning how to relate to that content so that you can appreciate the richness of it all. All of it. Even the poo.

To be really alive, no matter what.

A poo-free life of roses sounds nice. But even if possible, would it be? Really? Would life be anywhere near as interesting with no challenges, no “negatives”, no poo?

Embrace It All

By far, the best practice I’ve run across (and I’ve run across plenty) in this regard was discovered by John Sherman of River Ganga.

The simple practice he teaches pulled me out of the quicksand of what was becoming an alarming depression after a few huge blows that left me gasping for air.

The need to keep a distance from your own life, the need to maintain a wary watchfulness over what’s coming and going in your own life … that need vanishes. It just goes away.

And life is revealed to be what it’s always been, which is an endlessly challenging, rewarding adventure that is deeply interesting in its own right; that is unpredictable, wondrous; that consists of problems and solutions, desires and aversions that come and go, that have no effect other than to capture our interest.

John Sherman, A Worldwide Meeting – March 12, 2011

And as I continue to do “the looking” as he calls it, my relationship with this fascinating thing called life continues to improve.

John’s simple approach is radical and powerful, and he is a generous and humble man. I can’t recommend him enough.

And if you go to his site, I’d love to hear what you think.

The Privilege of Life

On a related note, my sweet, 79-years-young friend Christopher Foster of The Happy Seeker is launching his course today titled “How to Look (and Feel) 10 Years Younger in 4 Weeks”. Christopher has a beautiful spirit and much experience and wisdom about how to fully embrace life.

But aging isn’t an enemy. And it doesn’t need to be a drag. It’s a privilege, rightly.

Christopher Foster (from his new course)

I was lucky to be able to review his course materials and can tell you that if you actually do this course you will come away with useful insights and new habits that can make a marked improvement in how you experience life — no matter what your age.

I just know you’ll love his simple yet profound wisdom, and this world will be a better place because of his sharing of it.

And while you’re at it, check out his interview today on our mutual friend Tess’s inspiring blog The Bold Life.

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Apr 232011
 

Do not stand at my grave and weep.
I am not there I do not sleep.
I am a thousand winds that flow,
I am the sunlight on my own grave,

I am a gentle autumn rain,
I am the swift uplifting rush
of quiet birds in circled flight.

Do not stand at my grave and cry.
Do not stand at my grave and cry.
Do not stand at my grave and cry.
I am not there I did not die.

Lizzie West:  “Prayer”

I’ve found some comfort in listening to this evocative and hauntingly beautiful song these past few days.

3 days ago, my husband and I made the decision to help Jasmine, our sweet 13-year old boxer, take leave of her pain-wracked body. When she was young she could run like the wind, and we hope that’s what she’s doing again. She so loved it!

Lately we’d been working with the vet trying different pain meds for what we thought was an intensification of her life-long arthritis, but nothing seemed to help.

We found out Tuesday that she had bone cancer and that the already constant pain would only continue to get worse.

We made an appointment for the next day and brought her home for one last night so we could all have a little love-fest and say our goodbyes.

Of course we were and are heartbroken, but there was no question it was time. It’s so hard to take the life of anyone or anything, especially a beloved family member (which she definitely was). But in this case I actually felt some relief being able to help provide her with a release from her suffering. I am so grateful for the ability to do that, and for the loving manner in which our vet and her assistants handled everything.

The Initial Death Experience

When I was in my 20′s, I had a near-death experience. I was right on the brink of departing permanently, yet obviously, still had enough connection to my body to be able to choose to stay. (And it was a choice.)

But the point I want to make here is that it was such a liberating experience! Words cannot describe how expansive and freeing it was to move out of my body and let go, and I was not even in a painful body.

I knew for that brief moment that everything was perfectly fine. And not just there in the spirit world, but even here in the physical realm. Everything. Perfect. Fine. There was no stress, no tension, no anything but bright freedom and goodness.

My life had been so terribly heavy by contrast.

Still, I did decide to “come back”, in fact it was a little difficult to actually do it and I thank my lucky stars I was able to (it was a close call).

I didn’t get so far away as some who actually see other beings and go to “the light”. But it was enough to give me a taste of the experience of dying.

Remembering that was so helpful to me as we watched Jasmine go. I just knew that she was flying free at long last, just as I had done that day. That she was free of her crippling pain. Free of what she obviously held as her serious responsibility of taking care of us even while debilitated. Free and at ease. Liberated. Happy? I hope so.

Luminarias (a New Mexico tradition) on Jasmine's grave

A Goodbye, and a Hello

And so I know that even as we say goodbye to this awesome, sensual life experience here on this beautiful planet with all our fellow creatures, we are — at the same time — entering into another level of what can only be thought of as life as well.

Over the days we prepared for our goodbyes, I was struck by how many times I noticed signs of new life. New buds on the newly transplanted tree. Bright, lime-green leaves popping out on all the large trees along the road. Little flowers blooming even in the sand of this high desert.

I also notice that little birds keep appearing in the oddest of places, and every so often I hear new birdsongs that I haven’t heard in almost a year.

And today the hummingbirds have arrived for the season. How perfect is that?

New Birth, Resurrection, Renewal

And so on that note I wish you a Happy Easter. I hope you get to experience the vibrant sense of renewal that this holiday — this holy day — brings.

And just like the little hatchling of the symbolic Easter egg, may you feel the wonder and vigor of being born anew.

Even if, like us, you’re experiencing some sorrow or loss, may you also experience the sense of newness that that very same transition often brings with it if you but pay attention. For they are two sides of the same coin, after all.

And isn’t it just all a part of the richness of this thing called life? Precious, every bit of it.

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Feb 212011
 

Something rather startling happened to me in late 1992, soon after my dad passed away. It was both comforting and revelatory in its simple wisdom.

Several of my siblings and I were from out of town and were staying at his home. I’d been feeling his presence strongly, and made it a point during the days surrounding the funeral to take some quiet time alone to connect with him.

On one of these occasions I was telling him I loved him. I was crying and my heart was wide open.

And just as I said “Dad, I love you so much.” I heard, almost as if someone were in the room with me:

“You are love.”

I was struck by both the clarity and the simplicity of how the message came through, and what it implied. Also by how strongly it rang true.

Over the course of the next weeks and months, I found comfort in that experience. It really felt like I’d had a goodbye connection with Dad. I don’t know for sure but can’t explain otherwise how that message could have come through so strongly.

When we divided up Dad’s belongings, my sister got Dad’s wedding ring. It gave me an idea. A few months later I bought a ring to wear to remind me of Dad and the message I was given. I’ve since lost it but replaced it with this one that’s even more fitting, which I wear all the time. (Don’t you just love that it has wings? I won’t even start with the symbolism of that!)

As time’s gone on, I’ve found the message valuable in itself. It comes to mind often. It’s an interesting and useful idea to me. It’s a reminder of what I feel and believe we are; what our essence is.

It means that love is our natural state of being. Or maybe it’s even more simple than that, independent of states … or “being” even. We just are it! We just are love, and we couldn’t not be it even if we tried!

We don’t have to do anything out of the ordinary to “try” to love, to try to be compassionate, to try to forgive, etc.

Of course, that doesn’t mean we automatically do those things. It doesn’t mean we always express ourselves as the love that we are, showing constant compassion and forgiveness. Or even confrontation when it’s called for, and those aspects of expressing love that require courage, that are not all sugar and spice on the surface.

I’m seeing more and more that this life is about our stripping away that which is not us so that what we are (love?) can shine its light.

Not additive, but subtractive.

Simple.

As simple as that profound message I was given on that special day.

♥ ♥ ♥ ♥ ♥

So, you probably notice I’m having a little love fest this month. I’m between Valentine’s Day and my wedding anniversary (hmm, I guess that’s always true, isn’t it?!)

Plus, I’m listening to my heart a lot. And that feels like love (or something really good)!

I’m interested to hear what you might have to say about love. Do you think it’s an action or an essence, a way of being? Do you think it’s something we can add unto ourselves or others?

Do you think you are it?

Even more, I’d love to hear if you’ve ever received any messages that were brand new in the moment yet held up over time, like this one has for me. Surely you must have! Are you willing to share them?

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Nov 232010
 

We’ve all heard the phrase “count your blessings” and probably most of us do that quite often.

What we don’t always realize is that we’re neglecting to count some of our best ones because they’re tucked away in places we don’t think to consider.

If we take even a few moments to look we can find some of our most precious treasures buried among our discards. We quickly or even unconsciously judge certain things or experiences to be useless, inferior or even bad, and we toss them away, out of sight, out of mind.

We forget to notice the silver lining.

Gifts from Tragedy

Just last night, I heard of the death of a former classmate and old friend. He died of a sudden heart attack. This was sad enough but it came on the heels of the death of another classmate just a few weeks ago. Both cases are sad in their own way, and although I hadn’t seen one of them in many years, I still felt the loss.

Yet right along with the sadness of his death came a deep appreciation for the fact that I get to be alive. I mean, I’m alive! How cool is that?

If not for this tragedy,  I wouldn’t be experiencing my aliveness to the extent that I am this moment. In fact, I probably wouldn’t be thinking about or appreciating it at all.

And so, this new-found appreciation is a gift of this tragedy.

So this was one example, which just happens to be related to someone else’s misfortune. We easily gain new awareness of the blessings in our own lives when we notice how difficult life is for someone else, including many across the world.

More Hidden Gems

But there is also a benefit to considering our own tragedies and our own difficulties.

For hidden within them are deep and precious gifts.

I can say without a doubt that my most profound blessings have been borne of difficulty. And often the most trying situations bear the greatest gifts. They’re not all in the past, either. There are ongoing challenges, too, that are leaving little gifts in their wake, some I’m sure I haven’t even noticed yet.

The Discovery Process

One of the ways to spirit them out so we can avail ourselves of what they have to offer is to consider these questions and see if they reveal themselves. Some, if not most, are gifts not only to us but to others as well.

Here’s an exercise you can do:

Think of one major difficulty you’ve had, or something you’re going through now.

Got it?

Ok, now, go through these questions one by one with that experience in mind.

For any one situation, most of the questions will not apply. When that’s the case, just move on to the next question.

But there will probably be a handful of questions that will give you pause, and you will see that something new and wonderful entered your life when all you saw at the time was something that you just wanted to get rid of.

And if you have the time, take that moment to explore that question further in whatever way makes sense.

And now, may you discover some gems. :-)

  1. What did you learn that you are using to this day? Would you have learned it without that experience?
  2. Did you develop new skills that you benefit from, share, or enjoy?
  3. Did you become a better person? Did you discover or strengthen a part of your character that has been of value?
  4. Did you have to learn to ask for help? Was a new friendship developed because of that?
  5. Did anyone else benefit from what you went through?
  6. Were you able to help others in similar situations because of your experience?
  7. Did you discover new resources? Or friends you didn’t know you had?
  8. Did you let go of something that was not good for you, even if painful or disorienting at the time?
  9. Did you develop a new perspective on what’s good and what’s bad?
  10. Do you have a new set of values that feels better?
  11. Have you gained compassion and/or a more open heart?
  12. Have you learned how to let go of resentments, or to not develop them in the first place?
  13. Did you have the rug pulled out from under you, only to eventually land in a better place?
  14. If this was a loss of some sort, did something new and wonderful move into your life to fill the empty space that wouldn’t have been there otherwise?
  15. Have you learned how to let go of things when called for?
  16. Do you find any benefit to the impermanence of things? Does it give you an appreciation for things in the moment that you might not have had otherwise?
  17. Did you discover a different apparent source, or a new kind of flow? Is there less fear?
  18. Were you disillusioned? Do you have a new clarity about things, a new realism?
  19. Have you had a shift in your reality? A paradigm shift in what’s meaningful?
  20. Did you discover that you are okay no matter what?

You can repeat this as often as you’d like with any difficult situation.

Do you feel a little more blessed than when you started this exercise?

This exercise could easily include more questions. This set is subjective based on my experiences. I’m certain you have your own list and your own unique blessings that have come from your own difficulties as well. You can always add to it or replace questions as you see fit.

And of course, a few of these things may enter our lives even without difficulties, but it’s been my experience that difficulty is a sure catalyst for tremendous growth.

I dare say that without challenges, life wouldn’t be nearly so rich as it is.

Do you have any questions you’d like to add to this list? Or gifts you’ve gained from what felt like an unredeemable situation at the time? We’d love to hear.

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Oct 142010
 

Whatever could toilets and sacred moments possibly have in common, you ask?

A lot, actually, and your day will be all the better for knowing what. I promise!

Have you been appreciating how profoundly precious life is lately? If you’re like me, you forget every now and then.

Well, here’s a beautiful story that might jog your memory periodically, at least for awhile while it’s fresh in your mind. And maybe, like me, for long afterward.

Today I read a post by Kara of Conduit of Joy! that I found very touching. It in turn reminded me of something I’d read by Denise Linn that I still think of often, even though I first read it 8 months ago.

Essentially Denise shares what transpired between her and a friend who had just received the devastating news that she only had about 5 more days to live. (And I think I have problems?!)

I would not be able to do the story justice by piece-mealing it here… I think you would love reading the whole thing yourself (it’s short and quick, and don’t miss her p.s.) But I will share two potent quotes that I’ve taken away from it that enhance my life whenever I am fortunate enough to remember them.

In speaking of her friend:

“She said that she has realized that her entire life she’s been more afraid of living than of dying…”

WOW. Well. I can identify with that one. Can you? But it doesn’t really make sense to live that way, does it?!

And her friend said of knowing she only had a few more days to live:

“It makes every moment precious. When I go to the toilet, I know that there is only a limited number of times that I will be able to do that . . . and it makes it a ’sacred toilet moment’. When I go to sleep, this makes it a ’sacred sleeping moment’. Every bit of food, every conversation, and every moment . . . no matter how seemingly mundane, is precious. I’m cherishing it all. Really we should always be doing this.”

I absolutely, unequivocally loved this! It’s just perfect. Did you know a toilet discussion could be so, well, poignant? Holy? You may beg to differ, but anything that can make such a mundane thing so inspirational is good, grounded spirituality in my book! Gotta love it.

It also makes me aware of how blessed I am to be able to live fairly simply and to have the space and time to experience and appreciate without being overwhelmed. It’s common for me to be in awe of even simple things — which I quickly see are not simple at all, but totally miraculous!

And thanks in part to gentle reminders like these two posts, I get to appreciate yet again just how precious life is.

What is it that prompts you to do that?

Thank you for reading and sharing this virtual space. I guess I can enjoy the sound of one hand clapping, but two is so much more fun. Blessings to you!

[Photo: Egor Gribanov]